Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The joint of a horse's leg next to the foot; anatomically, the metacarpo- or metatarsophalangeal articulation. In the fore limb it corresponds to the knuckle at the base of the middle finger. See cut under fetter-bone.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I find that my poor little mare, Polly, has got staked in the fetlock-joint, and is nearly dead lame; but I must proceed.

    The Journals of John McDouall Stuart

  • The off fore-foot was rather long and narrow, and the fetlock-joint was inclined to be bowed outwards, but the degree of lameness was out of proportion to these defects, and the diagnosis was obscure.

    Diseases of the Horse's Foot

  • -- The foot, cut off at the fetlock-joint, showed extensive swelling all round the coronet.

    Diseases of the Horse's Foot

  • The anterior ligament of the fetlock-joint was thickened; the navicular bone was entire, but showed lesions of navicular disease, being ulcerated.

    Diseases of the Horse's Foot

  • In Fig. 37, _b_, the dotted line represents the changes of form in comparatively well-formed and sound hoofs at the moment of strongest over-extension [A] of the fetlock-joint.

    Diseases of the Horse's Foot

  • [Footnote A: The term 'over-extension,' as employed by Lungwitz, is intended to indicate that position assumed by the fetlock-joint when the opposite foot is raised from the ground.] 2.

    Diseases of the Horse's Foot

  • Contraction of the solar edge of the heels occurs at the moment of greatest over-extension of the fetlock-joint -- that is, in a foot with pressure from below absent.

    Diseases of the Horse's Foot

  • Fig. 37, _a_, by the dotted line represents the expansion at the moment of over-extension of the fetlock-joint.

    Diseases of the Horse's Foot

  • Among other causes, we may enumerate sprains or wounds of the flexor tendons, or any disease of the limbs for a long time preventing extension of the fetlock-joint, such as sprains or injuries of the posterior ligaments of the limb, splints or ringbones so placed as to interfere with the movements of the flexor tendons, or, in the hind-limb, spavin, keeping for some months the fetlock in a state of flexion.

    Diseases of the Horse's Foot

  • Bearing these landmarks in mind, we feel for the nerve in the hollow just above the fetlock-joint by noting the pulsations of the artery, and determining the edge of the flexor tendons.

    Diseases of the Horse's Foot

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.