Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. One who holds a feu.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One who holds a feu.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In Scots law, one who holds a feu or feus. Also fuar.

Etymologies

feu +‎ -ar (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Before the door of Saunders Jaup, a feuar of some importance, “who held his land free, and caredna a bodle for any one,” yawned that odoriferous gulf, ycleped, in Scottish phrase, the jawhole; in other words, an uncovered common sewer.

    Saint Ronan's Well

  • When by any accident they had met at church, market, or other place of public resort, she remembered the distant and respectful air with which the wife of the warlike baron was addressed by the spouse of the humble feuar.

    The Monastery

  • These out-field spots were selected by any feuar at his own choice, amongst the sheep-walks and hills which were always annexed to the Township, to serve as pasturage to the community.

    The Monastery

  • The trouble of cultivating these patches of out-field, and the precarious chance that the crop would pay the labour, were considered as giving a right to any feuar, who chose to undertake the adventure, to the produce which might result from it.

    The Monastery

  • Two or three miserable huts, at the foot of the fortalice, held the bondsmen and tenants of the feuar.

    The Monastery

  • But in very truth he also came to have an eye upon the contents of each stack, and to obtain such information respecting the extent of the crop reaped and gathered in by each feuar, as might prevent the possibility of abstracted multures.

    The Monastery

  • The monks repaired their ravaged shrines — the feuar again roofed his small fortalice which the enemy had ruined — the poor labourer rebuilt his cottage — an easy task, where a few sods, stones, and some pieces of wood from the next copse, furnished all the materials necessary.

    The Monastery

  • William Sim was the son of a feuar in the southern part of

    Wilson's Tales of the Borders and of Scotland, Volume XXIII

  • But in very truth he also came to have an eye upon the contents of each stack, and to obtain such information respecting the extent of the crop reaped and gathered in by each feuar, as might prevent the possibility of _abstracted multures_.

    The Monastery

  • The monks repaired their ravaged shrines -- the feuar again roofed his small fortalice which the enemy had ruined -- the poor labourer rebuilt his cottage -- an easy task, where a few sods, stones, and some pieces of wood from the next copse, furnished all the materials necessary.

    The Monastery

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