Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Obsolete form of feign.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To feign.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • A Middle English form of feign.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And as Homere, like a learned Poete, doth feyne, that Circes, by pleasant in-chantmentes, did turne men into beastes, some into Swine, som into Asses, some into Foxes, some into Wolues etc. euen so

    The Scholemaster

  • Nature is feyne of crafte here eien to borowe, 416

    Caxton's Book of Curtesye

  • Cheef bellewedir/of feyned [Q] trwaundise this is to meene/my silf I cowde feyne

    Early English Meals and Manners

  • And as Homere, like a learned Poete, doth feyne, that Circes, by pleasant in - chantmentes, did turne men into beastes, some into Swine, som into Asses, some into Foxes, some into Wolues etc. euen so

    The Scholemaster

  • And as _Homere_, like a learned Poete, doth feyne, that _Circes_, by pleasant in - chantmentes, did turne men into beastes, some into Swine, som into Asses, some into Foxes, some into Wolues etc. euen so

    The Schoolmaster

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