Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun An insoluble white protein that is the essential component of raw silk and spider-web filaments.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The principal chemical constituent of silk, cobwebs, and the horny skeletons of sponges.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Chem.) A variety of gelatin; the chief ingredient of raw silk, extracted as a white amorphous mass.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun biochemistry A tough elastic protein that is the main component of silk and of spider's webs

Etymologies

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Examples

  • The key difference between dry silks from moths and butterflies and wet silks from caddisflies is that the serines in the silk from caddisflies are "phosphorylated," meaning phosphates are added to the serines as the fibroin silk protein is synthesized.

    THE MEDICAL NEWS

  • He found the caddisfly silk is a fiber made of large proteins named fibroin (fye-bro-in) with an amino acid named serine making up a fifth of the amino acids in fibroin.

    THE MEDICAL NEWS

  • Stewart says his goal was to characterize the adhesive silk fiber "for the purpose of trying to copy it" so a synthetic version can be used as a surgical adhesive. he found the caddisfly silk is a fiber made of large proteins named fibroin (fye-bro-in) with an amino acid named serine making up a fifth of the amino acids in fibroin.

    Newswise: Latest News

  • Georgakoudi I, Tsai I, Greiner C, Wong C, DeFelice J, et al. (2007) Intrinsic fluorescence changes associated with the conformational state of silk fibroin in biomaterial matrices.

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  • The silk is a continuous-filament fiber consisting of fibroin protein, secreted from two salivary glands in the head of each larva, and a gum called sericin, which cements the two filaments together.

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  • The key difference between dry silks from moths and butterflies and wet silks from caddisflies is that the serines in the silk from caddisflies are "phosphorylated," meaning phosphates are added to the serines as the fibroin silk protein is synthesized.

    Newswise: Latest News

  • What's left in the cartridge is a clear, viscous solution of the purified protein silk fibroin.

    Medlogs - Recent stories

  • (silkworm) and regulation of fibroin L chain production by microRNAs in heterologous system.

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  • "These fibroin proteins that make up the silks are water-soluble because of the electrical charges.

    Newswise: Latest News

  • "These fibroin proteins that make up the silks are water-soluble because of the electrical charges.

    THE MEDICAL NEWS

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