Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A tent.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The criminal charges, which carry up to a $5,000 fine and a six-month jail term, originated with a Jan. 28 incident in which Mr. Lay, a deacon at a local Baptist church, asked Mr. Freeman to offer mealtime prayers at a lunch for school employees and booster-club members who had helped with a school field-house project.

    Archive 2009-08-01

  • Athletic grounds were secured together with a field-house, and Christ Church teams won an enviable reputation for high standards of sportsmanship.

    Frank H. Nelson of Cincinnati

  • Such a boy, it flashed across my mind, ought to be studying the possible plays of football of an evening in the field-house after his dinner at the training-table, rather than the possible gyrations of the little platinum ball on the wheel.

    The Silent Bullet

  • A plane cruised past the crowd around the field-house during the Flight Endurance and Trim Test at the Competitive Technology Event at Johnson County

    Kansas City Star: Front Page

  • A plane cruised past the crowd around the field-house.

    Kansas City Star: Front Page

  • The McCord meeting is scheduled for 4 to 7 p.m. on March 26 in the field-house lobby at Springfield High School.

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  • District Judge Margaret C. "Casey" Rodgers after Mr. Lay asked Mr. Freeman to offer mealtime prayers at a Jan. 28 lunch for school employees and booster-club members who had helped with a school field-house project.

    The Washington Times stories: Latest Headlines

  • Branch McCracken’s voice was unforgettable, a deep bass gone gravelly from overuse, rumbling out of that big frame projecting authority and reaching his players over the din of a packed field-house.

    Getting Open

  • At any second a scrimmage might be stopped by the screech of McCracken’s whistle, and the coach’s deep voice would echo through the empty field-house, pointing out a mistake (“That’s an awful long way to run and still not score!” or handing out encouragement (“You’re operatin,’ you’re operatin.’

    Getting Open

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