Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Iron or steel for striking fire with flint.
  • n. plural Utensils employed for managing a fire, consisting of poker, shovel, and tongs.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Reaching the kitchen, where the family breakfasted in winter to save house-labor, he sat down by the fire, and looked a long time at the pair of dancing shadows cast by each fire-iron and dog-knob on the whitewashed chimney-corner — a yellow one from the window, and a blue one from the fire.

    The Woodlanders

  • Tenio produced his dagger, but Conan drove the fire-iron point-first through the ferret-faced man's chest and caught the blade as it dropped from the transfixed man's nerveless fingers. Marusas 'sword leaped into his hand, then the Zamoran was staggering back, trying to scream around the dagger that had blossomed in fountains of scarlet in his throat.

    Conan The Triumphant

  • Patch-nose was the first to see Conan free of his bonds, but the man had only time to goggle before wine sprayed out of his mouth and his skull was crushed by the fire-iron.

    Conan The Triumphant

  • The little hand, that "had never spread itself over a doorknob or a fire-iron or any clumsy thing" struggled valiantly with the russet bag; the new

    Little Miss By-The-Day

  • All at once he was galvanized into the rigidity of a fire-iron --

    The Prodigal Father

  • And, my dear, "she had pursued," white-washed walls, bare brick floors, not a picture, not a curtain, not even a fire-iron.

    Complete Project Gutenberg John Galsworthy Works

  • Mrs. Hurd gave no sign, but the dark figure on the other side of the cottage made an involuntary movement, which threw down a fire-iron, and sent a start through Willie's wasted body.

    Marcella

  • Reaching the kitchen, where the family breakfasted in winter to save house-labor, he sat down by the fire, and looked a long time at the pair of dancing shadows cast by each fire-iron and dog-knob on the whitewashed chimney-corner -- a yellow one from the window, and a blue one from the fire.

    The Woodlanders

  • I remember that when I grasped the fire-iron, by the strange working of habit I employed it for the moment in its proper use; and as I began to stir the embers on the hearth, my original purpose was forgotten.

    Dorothy Vernon of Haddon Hall

  • The long-legged veteran, who had been besieging the fire-iron, as before related, now took down his cumbrous length, and rearing aloft his tall form, walked up to the advertisement and very deliberately spit a full discharge of tobacco-juice on it.

    Uncle Tom's Cabin

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