Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A flint used with a steel for striking fire.
  • noun Iron pyrites: so called because it strikes fire with steel. See pyrites.
  • noun A stone which resists the action of fire; especially, a kind of sandstone used in fireplaces: same as malmrock.
  • noun An incendiary composition employed to set fire to ships, buildings, etc.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In the shadows beneath the balcony a ghostly light began to glow and grow, a light that was not part of the fire-stone gleam.

    The Conquering Sword of Conan

  • In the shadows beneath the balcony a ghostly light began to glow and grow, a light that was not part of the fire-stone gleam.

    The Conquering Sword Of Conan

  • In the shadows beneath the balcony a ghostly light began to glow and grow, a light that was not part of the fire-stone gleam.

    The Conan Chronicles

  • In the shadows beneath the balcony a ghostly light began to glow and grow, a light that was not part of the fire-stone gleam.

    Red Nails

  • In the shadows beneath the balcony a ghostly light began to glow and grow, a light that was not part of the fire-stone gleam.

    Conan The Warrior

  • In the shadows beneath the balcony a ghostly light began to glow and grow, a light that was not part of the fire-stone gleam.

    Conan The Warrior

  • It was from this use that the sulphuret of iron derived the name of pyrites, or fire-stone.

    The International Monthly Magazine, Volume 5, No. 1, January, 1852

  • The inhabitants of the villages at a distance from the Spaniards, have knives made of fire-stone, (_pierre de feu_,) of which they also make hatchets; the largest to fell middling and little trees with; the less, to flay and cut up the beasts they kill.

    History of Louisisana Or of the Western Parts of Virginia and Carolina: Containing

  • This opening provided draught for the fire, and at the back, from the fire-stone, an opening had been left, and here to several feet above the top of the stove, a length of stove-pipe carried all smoke out and above the heads of the scouts.

    Girl Scouts in the Adirondacks

  • Now we have water, earth, and chalk with its fire-stone.

    Historical Miniatures

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