Definitions

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. annual of central United States having showy long-stalked yellow flower heads marked with scarlet or purple in the center

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • For the nomad of the fire-wheel was a girl, tall and slender, barbarically arrayed in the holiday garb of a Seminole chief.

    Diane of the Green Van

  • What wonder if Diane built faces and fancies in the ember-glow of the Seminole fire-wheel?

    Diane of the Green Van

  • Curiously the girl rode toward it, unaware that the picturesque fire-wheel ahead was the typical camp fire of the southern Indian, or that the strange wild figure squatting gravely by the fire in lonely silhouette against the white of a canvas-covered wagon beyond in the trees, was a vagrant

    Diane of the Green Van

  • The Emperor then heard that the foreigners had invented a ` ` fire-wheel cart, '' but whether he had ever been informed that they had built a small railroad at Wu-Sung near Shanghai, and that the Chinese had bought it, and then torn it up and thrown it into the river we cannot say.

    Court Life In China

  • Not long after he had heard of the railroads, he was told that the foreigners also had ` ` fire-wheel boats. ''

    Court Life In China

  • The Emperor then heard that the foreigners had invented a "fire-wheel cart," but whether he had ever been informed that they had built a small railroad at Wu-Sung near Shanghai, and that the Chinese had bought it, and then torn it up and thrown it into the river we cannot say.

    Court Life in China

  • Not long after he had heard of the railroads, he was told that the foreigners also had "fire-wheel boats."

    Court Life in China

  • In the midst of his wild orgies, Peterkin acted an impromptu and unintentional part by tripping over the brow of the hill, and rolling down the steep declivity like a fire-wheel into the very midst of the flying crew.

    The Gorilla Hunters

  • True it is that on certain feast days and above all on Midsummer night, the folk would pluck up a heart, and gather together as gaily clad as might be where the Flood was the narrowest (save at one place, whereof more hereafter), and there on each side would trundle the fire-wheel, and do other Midsummer games, and make music of string-play and horns, and sing songs of old time and drink to each other, and depart at last to their own homes blessing each other.

    The Sundering Flood

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