Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun An obsolete form of flagrancy.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun Flagrancy.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun flagrancy

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I started off with a lukewarm interest in the underdog winning, but the flagrance of the shitty officiating was too much.

    Cheeseburger Gothic » I’m in lerv with Annabel.

  • Its freshness, the charming flagrance of wood and that beautiful shade of green are some major elements of the desired Christmas tree.

    Tips for Finding and Keeping a Fresh Christmas Tree

  • R, how must his peturnle art have bet, as these Budds, which he had nurrisht, bust into buty, and twined in blooming flagrance round his pirentle Busm!

    Novels by Eminent Hands

  • R, how must his peturnle art have bet, as these Budds, which he had nurrisht, bust into buty, and twined in blooming flagrance round his pirentle Busm!

    Burlesques

  • And when the curtain rose on the most notoriously flagrant play the city boasted, they added to its flagrance by their whispered explanations and remarks.

    The Witness

  • Through the rigour of winter we had been brought now to the very flagrance of the dog-star, to the time when human nature can pretend no opposition to the mood of the lordly sun.

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 61, No. 380, June, 1847

  • She knows to an inch the degrees of flagrance officially permitted to the attached and the unattached!

    Far to Seek A Romance of England and India

  • I have fine enough stuff in me, let alone the energy begotten by the flagrance of His injustice, to take higher grounds with Him than that.

    The History of Sir Richard Calmady A Romance

  • Budds, which he had nurrisht, bust into buty, and twined in blooming flagrance round his pirentle Busm!

    Burlesques

  • I, will it look hard in me, to exaggerate Matters against a Man, whom every body reckons as already Cast; the flagrance of whose Guilt, tho 'all are sensible of, they may yet be apt inwardly to favour him, from a natural Pity for his presumptive Condemnation.

    Pliny's Epistles in Ten Books: Volume 1, Books 1-6

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