Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of flatcar.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • For the next six weeks there was scarcely an asset of the Southern Pacific that Cory did not conscript to close the breach with a massive rock dam—1,200 miles of track, three thousand flatcars, and an army of workers.

    Colossus

  • He thinks of jefes politicos, rurales, the strike, the lockout, hunger, General Rosalio Martinez, the soldiers of Porfirio Diaz and their death-spitting rifles, of flatcars of bodies consigned to Vera Cruz as shark-food, his father and mother among them.

    “Have you lived? What have you got to show for it?”

  • From these it was hoped that the flatcars could dump rock into the river faster than the current could wash it away—the exact same method that would be used to seal off the river for construction of a great dam nearly thirty years later.

    Colossus

  • From these it was hoped that the flatcars could dump rock into the river faster than the current could wash it away—the exact same method that would be used to seal off the river for construction of a great dam nearly thirty years later.

    Colossus

  • Incoming ships landed outside, and were then hauled in on flatcars.

    Here There Are Monsters

  • For the next six weeks there was scarcely an asset of the Southern Pacific that Cory did not conscript to close the breach with a massive rock dam—1,200 miles of track, three thousand flatcars, and an army of workers.

    Colossus

  • Its owner, the Brooklyn, Flatbush and Coney Island Railroad, jacked the thing up and hauled it inland in one piece, using six locomotives, 112 flatcars, and twenty-four specially laid tracks.

    Archive 2008-10-01

  • Its owner, the Brooklyn, Flatbush and Coney Island Railroad, jacked the thing up and hauled it inland in one piece, using six locomotives, 112 flatcars, and twenty-four specially laid tracks.

    Nomadic Hotels and Lighthouses

  • To haul the snow away, they used steam shovels, cranes, and railway flatcars to get the snow off the streets and dumped into the rivers.

    Snow removal in the United States

  • By the end of the century, the railroad yards at Houston each ginning season were clogged with long lines of boxcars and flatcars stacked high with bales of cotton.

    THE AMERICAN WEST

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