Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Simple past tense and past participle of flecker.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Soon he melted into the fleckered shadows, and I saw him no more.

    The King Must Die

  • Mr. Hawthorne has been lying down in the sunshine, slightly fleckered with the shadows of a tree, and Una and Julian have been making him look like the mighty Tan by covering his chin and breast with long grass-blades, that looked like a verdant and venerable beard.

    Memories of Hawthorne

  • It was beautiful to see the serene gleam of Una's face, fleckered with sunlight; and

    Memories of Hawthorne

  • WHILE Silas and Eppie were seated on the bank discoursing in the fleckered shade of the ash tree, Miss Priscilla Lammeter was resisting her sister's arguments, that it would be better to take tea at the Red House, and let her father have a long nap, than drive home to the Warrens so soon after dinner.

    Silas Marner (1885)

  • Then when he felt that he could act as convoy no farther, down he came at one long unpausing dart to the furrow adjoining the wooded dell below, which was now all streaked with fleckered light.

    The Story of a Dewdrop

  • Roderick was reclining on the margin of a fountain which gushed into the fleckered sunshine with the same clear sparkle and the same voice of airy quietude as when trees of primeval growth flung their shadows cross its bosom.

    Egotism; or, The Bosom Serpent

  • Often, too, he ran a little way in advance of his companion, and then stood to watch her as she approached along the shadowy and sun-fleckered path.

    The Marble Faun - Volume 1 The Romance of Monte Beni

  • It is scattered with fleckered cows and dappled fawns.

    Imogen A Pastoral Romance

  • But while she was resolved to say an affectionate farewell to Philip, how she looked forward to that evening walk in the still, fleckered shade of the hollows, away from all that was harsh and unlovely; to the affectionate, admiring looks that would meet her; to the sense of comradeship that childish memories would give to wiser, older talk; to the certainty that Philip would care to hear everything she said, which no one else cared for!

    III. The Wavering Balance. Book V—Wheat and Tares

  • Mr. Hawthorne has been lying down in the sun shine, slightly fleckered with The shadows of a tree, and Una and Julian have been making him look like the mighty Pan, by covering his chin and breast with long grass-blades, that looked like a verdant and venerable beard. "

    The House of the Seven Gables

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