Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Swift of foot.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Swift of foot; running or able to run with rapidity.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • As is aforesaid she was as fleet-foot as a deer, so but in a little space of time she had come to the creek, and leapt into the boat, panting and breathless.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • Wherefore she turned and went hastily down the hall, and out-a-doors, and over the bridge, and ran fleet-foot down the rocky way whereby she had come, till she could run no further, and lay down under a great stone breathless and fordone; yet her heart upheld her and suffered her not to swoon, belike because she had given her limbs such hard work to do.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • O see the fleet-foot host of men, who march with faces drawn,

    Roddy McCorley

  • Or as the fleet-foot roe that ’s tir’d with chasing,

    Venus and Adonis

  • "'Tis I, fleet-foot, winged messenger, humble slave," laughed Louis, with another grotesque bow; but the rogue had cleverly put himself between the squaw and Miriam's tent.

    Lords of the North

  • Ah yes, the fleet-foot vision that ever eludes me!

    The King of the Dark Chamber

  • No one of the felons was nimble enough to escape from the fleet-foot hunters of Burgdale, and they were all slain there to the number of eleven.

    The Roots of the Mountains; Wherein Is Told Somewhat of the Lives of the Men of Burgdale

  • Wherefore she turned and went hastily down the hall, and out-a - doors, and over the bridge, and ran fleet-foot down the rocky way whereby she had come, till she could run no further, and lay down under a great stone breathless and fordone; yet her heart upheld her and suffered her not to swoon, belike because she had given her limbs such hard work to do.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • Conquer the fleet-foot doe with slot-tracks smoking and burning.

    The Carmina of Caius Valerius Catullus

  • Or as the fleet-foot roe that's tired with chasing,

    Venus and Adonis

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