Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A welfare state model with a proactive labour market policy, combining easy hiring and firing (flexibility for employers) and high benefits for the unemployed (security for the employees).

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Blend of flexibility and security, coined by Danish prime minister Poul Nyrup Rasmussen in the 1990s.

Examples

  • He recommended "flexicurity" -- which mixes lifelong learning and job training, flexible labour market policies and high levels of social protection -- as the way to modernise Europe's labour policies.

    EU News

  • That's largely because of a system called flexicurity that gives employers the freedom to hire and fire, while the state supports laid-off workers with generous benefits and training.

    Can The European Welfare State Survive?

  • Restructured to compete globally, it enacted "flexicurity"-an important pre-text in setting the stage for Denmark's brain-powered environment.

    Forbes.com: News

  • Restructured to compete globally, it enacted "flexicurity"-an important pre-text in setting the stage for Denmark's brain-powered environment.

    Forbes.com: News

  • Restructured to compete globally, it enacted "flexicurity"-an important pre-text in setting the stage for Denmark's brain-powered environment.

    Forbes.com: News

  • With these revenues, the state spends roughly 5 percent of its GDP on the unemployed and as much as 2 percent alone on "flexicurity" labor market programs to help retrain displaced workers.

    Eric Alterman: Think Again: The Economist's "Happy" Ignorance

  • With these revenues, the state spends roughly 5 percent of its GDP on the unemployed and as much as 2 percent alone on "flexicurity" labor market programs to help retrain displaced workers.

    Eric Alterman: Think Again: The Economist's "Happy" Ignorance

  • With these revenues, the state spends roughly 5 percent of its GDP on the unemployed and as much as 2 percent alone on "flexicurity" labor market programs to help retrain displaced workers.

    Eric Alterman: Think Again: The Economist's "Happy" Ignorance

  • With these revenues, the state spends roughly 5 percent of its GDP on the unemployed and as much as 2 percent alone on "flexicurity" labor market programs to help retrain displaced workers.

    Eric Alterman: Think Again: The Economist's "Happy" Ignorance

  • Denmark, once hailed for its "flexicurity" system (state-subsidized programs offering temporary work to prevent layoffs, job training and up to four years of assistance for those without work), is lopping the program in half.

    How to Create Jobs

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