Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun UK Alternative spelling of flick knife.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a pocketknife with a blade that springs open at the press of a button

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He led his raiders in through a window he opened with the tip of his flick-knife.

    Spell of Magic – Part 12 « Official Harry Harrison News Blog

  • He led his raiders in through a window he opened with the tip of his flick-knife.

    2008 December « Official Harry Harrison News Blog

  • Depardieu's flick-knife is stuck in his stomach, and the dying man's description of his attacker is pointedly applicable to Depardieu.

    Archive 2008-08-01

  • The setting is uncannily deserted but for these two and the conversation rich with non sequiturs, but the real quirk comes when the flick-knife is laid down on a seat behind them only to have disappeared when they next turn to look for it.

    Archive 2008-08-01

  • In the opening scene, a commuter waiting in an otherwise empty Metro station is disconcerted by a conversation with a character played by Gerard Depardieu, in which the latter talks of his dreams of murder and displays a potential weapon -- a flick-knife.

    Archive 2008-08-01

  • Depardieu's flick-knife is stuck in his stomach, and the dying man's description of his attacker is pointedly applicable to Depardieu.

    Notes on Strange Fiction: The Pataphysical Quirk

  • The setting is uncannily deserted but for these two and the conversation rich with non sequiturs, but the real quirk comes when the flick-knife is laid down on a seat behind them only to have disappeared when they next turn to look for it.

    Notes on Strange Fiction: The Pataphysical Quirk

  • Blowing up those bridges then, considering the film as a purely autotelic artwork, it is quite possible, I'd argue, to read the work as dealing wholly with symbols and the relationships between them: a deserted Metro station; a flick-knife; a murder; a deserted tower-block; a wife; a police commissioner; a strangler; and so on.

    Notes on Strange Fiction: Postmodern(ism)

  • In the opening scene, a commuter waiting in an otherwise empty Metro station is disconcerted by a conversation with a character played by Gerard Depardieu, in which the latter talks of his dreams of murder and displays a potential weapon -- a flick-knife.

    Notes on Strange Fiction: The Pataphysical Quirk

  • Blowing up those bridges then, considering the film as a purely autotelic artwork, it is quite possible, I'd argue, to read the work as dealing wholly with symbols and the relationships between them: a deserted Metro station; a flick-knife; a murder; a deserted tower-block; a wife; a police commissioner; a strangler; and so on.

    Archive 2008-08-01

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