Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of flippancy.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I wrote an essay on Jewish hipsterism, since you asked, because it is one of “the flippancies of the present moment,” which John Podhoretz has promised that Commentary will “take up polemical arms against” under his editorship.

    Such Jews are not hipsters

  • And among other things, he said, this would require “taking up polemical arms against many of the flippancies of the present moment.”

    Jewish hipsters do exist—but not for long

  • And I don't spend gobs of time honing the flippancies I wrap around the links.

    Another June Linkfest

  • I depend upon your forgiveness of all the perhaps unseasonable flippancies of your naturally too lively, yet most sincerely sympathizing, ANNA HOWE.

    Clarissa Harlowe

  • They try to talk the elegancies and flippancies of the modern spirit.

    The Plumed Serpent

  • He heard status reports from faraway sections of the nonexistent ship, unimportant flippancies over intercom channels, sensors cooing peacefully beneath the more strident computer prompts.

    The Kobayashi Maru

  • 'I completely endorse it, though it would have been better without your occasional flippancies.'

    between silk and cyanide

  • On the morning of the fourth day out -- she had not felt quite well enough for adventures before -- she found her way to the second-class saloon, being no doubt fully justified of her conscience in abandoning the first to the flippancies of its preference.

    Hilda A Story of Calcutta

  • Alicia hurried in with something palliating -- she could remember flippancies of her own that had been rebuked -- but there was no sigh or token of disapproval in Arnold's face.

    Hilda A Story of Calcutta

  • Treitschke complained of their frequent irreverences and flippancies but in both respects Heine, "the wittiest Frenchman since Voltaire," was merely following in the footsteps of his predecessor, and Boerne, like Diderot, knew that the most effective weapon against authority is sarcasm.

    The Menorah Journal, Volume 1, 1915

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