Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of florin.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • Holland paid five millions and a half, and France, under the direction of M. de Vergennes, four millions and a half of florins, that is to say, nine millions and forty-five thousand francs, according to M. Soulavie.

    Court Memoirs of France Series — Complete

  • The Prince of Orange, as heir apparent, is accorded by the state an annual income of 100,000 florins, which is increased to

    The Governments of Europe

  • "Holy father, I hand you twelve florins, which is all that we can give, though we well know how poor a pay it is for the wondrous things which you sell us."

    The White Company

  • "Holy father, I hand you twelve florins, which is all that we can give, though we well know how poor a pay it is for the wondrous things which you sell us."

    The White Company

  • "Holy father, I hand you twelve florins, which is all that we can give, though we well know how poor a pay it is for the wondrous things which you sell us."

    The White Company

  • "Holy father, I hand you twelve florins, which is all that we can give, though we well know how poor a pay it is for the wondrous things which you sell us."

    The White Company

  • "Holy father, I hand you twelve florins, which is all that we can give, though we well know how poor a pay it is for the wondrous things which you sell us."

    The White Company

  • Holland paid five millions and a half, and France, under the direction of M. de Vergennes, four millions and a half of florins, that is to say, nine millions and forty-five thousand francs, according to M. Soulavie.

    Marie Antoinette — Complete

  • Holland paid five millions and a half, and France, under the direction of M. de Vergennes, four millions and a half of florins, that is to say, nine millions and forty-five thousand francs, according to M. Soulavie.

    Marie Antoinette — Volume 04

  • Thus in Holland they reckon by bank florins, which is only a fictitious money, and which in commerce is sometimes of a greater, sometimes of a less value than the coin which is denominated a florin.

    Reflections on the Formation and Distribution of Wealth

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