Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A tropical leguminous bush (Poinciana or Caesalpinia pulcherrima) with prickly branches and showy yellow or red flowers.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A tropical leguminous bush (Poinciana pulcherrima, or Cæsalpinia, pulcherrima) with prickly branches, and showy yellow or red flowers; -- so named from its having been sometimes used for hedges in the West Indies.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A West Indian name for the Cæsalpinia pulcherrima, a large-flowered leguminous shrub sometimes used for hedges. Also called flower-pride and Barbadospride.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

So named from its having been sometimes used for hedges in the West Indies.

Examples

  • "Stop her!" was Amyas 'first word; but his next was, "Let her go!" for springing like a deer through the little garden, and over the flower-fence, she turned, menacing with her blow-gun the sailors, who had already started in her pursuit.

    Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 8

  • "Stop her!" were Amyas's first words; but his next were, "Let her go!" for, springing like a deer through the little garden and over the flower-fence, she turned, menacing with her blow-gun the sailors, who had already started in her pursuit.

    Westward Ho!, or, the voyages and adventures of Sir Amyas Leigh, Knight, of Burrough, in the county of Devon, in the reign of her most glorious majesty Queen Elizabeth

  • As the dark beauty forced her way, the maypole-aloe shook its yellow crown of flowers, many feet above her head; the lilac jessamine danced before her face; and the white datura, the pink flower-fence, and the scarlet cordia, closed round her form, or spread themselves beneath her feet.

    The Hour and the Man, An Historical Romance

  • With that immense quantity of large pebbles which now block up these paths, and which are scattered over most of the ground of this island, he formed pyramidal heaps here and there, at the base of which he laid mould, and planted rose-bushes, the Barbadoes flower-fence, and other shrubs which love to climb the rocks.

    Paul et Virginie. English

  • “Stop her!” were Amyas’s first words; but his next were, “Let her go!” for, springing like a deer through the little garden and over the flower-fence, she turned, menacing with her blow-gun the sailors, who had already started in her pursuit.

    Westward Ho!

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