Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Infantry.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The Highlanders being astonishing foot-folk, and the Colonel being full of analogies and digressions, the tower of Leek church came in sight before we had got the

    The Yeoman Adventurer

  • Hitherto, civilized Europe had depended for offensive and defensive operations on large slow-moving armies of foot-folk; these were ineffective against marauding barbarians, Vikings in their sharp-prowed ships, or the light cavalry of Hungarian or Saracen.

    From a Terrace in Prague

  • George Frundsberg of Mindelheim, a colonel of foot-folk in the Imperial service at Pavia fight, and during the wars of the Constable Bourbon: and one of Frundsberg's military companions was a certain Carpzow, or

    The Virginians

  • To the Emperor was a great body of horsemen, and so much the more a greater body of foot-folk.

    The Sagas of Olaf Tryggvason and of Harald The Tyrant (Harald Haardraade)

  • ¶ It was with an exceeding vast host that King Harald Godwinson had come thither, a host of both horse and foot-folk.

    The Sagas of Olaf Tryggvason and of Harald The Tyrant (Harald Haardraade)

  • A favourite book of his grandfather had been the life of old George Frundsberg of Mindelheim, a colonel of foot-folk in the Imperial service at Pavia fight, and during the wars of the Constable Bourbon: and one of Frundsberg’s military companions was a certain Carpzow, or Carpezan, whom our friend selected as his tragedy hero.

    The Virginians

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