Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Archaic spelling of forbear.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • And therefore I, who intend to relate something, which (peradventure) might appeare doubtfull: will forbeare (seeing you in such a difference; for that which hath bin spoken alreadie) to use any difficult discourse; but will speake of one, a man of no meane ranke or quality, being both a valiant and vertuous King, and what he did, without any impeach or blemish to his honor.

    The Decameron

  • If I should faile in the manner of their facilitie, yet love and duty hath enstructed me, to forbeare your least paining, which no unmannerly Barber will do.

    The Decameron

  • Alessandro, forbeare such boldnesse, uppon thy lives perill, and before thou further presume to touch me, understand what I shall tell thee.

    The Decameron

  • Signior Thorello could not forbeare weeping, but being much hindred therby, answered in few words.

    The Decameron

  • Why then I will tell thee, answered the Admirall, that thou mayest take the better knowledge of them, and forbeare hereafter, to be so over violently transported with anger.

    The Decameron

  • If he say he wit do it, it is as much as I desire: but if hee trifle and make deniall, then boldly tell him, that he must refraine all places wheresoever I am, and forbeare to send me any more Letters, or messages.

    The Decameron

  • Nay more (quoth he) I cannot forbeare to tell you, that when I passed thorow the Port, I saw you standing with the Warders; yet, by vertue of that excellent Stone, undiscovered of you all.

    The Decameron

  • Love, forbeare a little while to sleepe, for heere is thy loyall friend Jeronimo.

    The Decameron

  • Upon this immodest meditation, and his purpose quite altered which he came for; he went neerer to her, and very kindly began to comfort her, desiring her to forbeare weeping: and (by further insinuating speeches) acquainted her with his amorous intention.

    The Decameron

  • But in the end, looking on each other with strange behaviour, they could not forbeare smiling: which the Queene interrupting by a command of attention, turning to Madame Aemillia, willed her to follow next.

    The Decameron

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