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Examples

  • That appears to be a punch used for taking large uterine tissue samples and a vaginal packing forcep.

    These Cakes Are Not Wrecks (But They Play Them on TV)

  • After another 10 hour round of pointless pain (the last few hours I was so out of it I would only become conscious to breathe through contractions) I decided they should just cut her out rather than make me come back the next day for more induction. and so, at 5: 44pm on November 25th, I was cut open and Sidalee Marie was unwedged from my uterus with a forcep.

    dragonwench Diary Entry

  • This will force the points of the forcep further between the roots and lifts the tooth up and out.

    Chapter 6

  • Warning: Do not use the ‘cowhorn’ forcep to take out a baby molar.

    Chapter 6

  • For example, for the four instruments for removing teeth (excavator, elevator, upper forcep, and lower forcep), ECHO’S 1983 price is

    Chapter 7

  • A tool that makes a good temporary clamp for plastic gas pipes is the locking doctor's clamp called a forcep.

    Chapter 10

  • On this day of labor, the mother, who has gone through the long tedious days of waiting, should see to it that nothing unclean -- hands, sponges, forcep, water, cloth -- is allowed to touch her.

    The Mother and Her Child

  • Down below, under the light, the doctor was sewing up the great long, forcep-spread, thickedged, wound.

    A Farewell To Arms

  • This forcep is applicable to arteries of all sizes, and is the surest of the methods employed for arresting the flow of blood.

    An Epitome of Practical Surgery, for Field and Hospital.

  • Draw the artery out and isolate it for half an inch; seize it with a narrow round pointed forcep transversely on a level with the wound; and mash it so as to rupture the inner coats, while the proper torsion forceps are applied to the free end of the vessel, and the artery twisted by them upon its axis, from three to eight times.

    An Epitome of Practical Surgery, for Field and Hospital.

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