Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The front part of the running-gear of a four-wheeled carriage, including the fore axle and wheels.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Above and around these two delicate heads, all made of happiness and steeped in light, the gigantic fore-carriage, black with rust, almost terrible, all entangled in curves and wild angles, rose in a vault, like the entrance of a cavern.

    Les Miserables

  • This fore-carriage was composed of a massive iron axle-tree with a pivot, into which was fitted a heavy shaft, and which was supported by two huge wheels.

    Les Miserables

  • It was the fore-carriage of one of those trucks which are used in wooded tracts of country, and which serve to transport thick planks and the trunks of trees.

    Les Miserables

  • Artillery-men were pushing the piece; it was in firing trim; the fore-carriage had been detached; two upheld the gun-carriage, four were at the wheels; others followed with the caisson.

    Les Miserables

  • When the engine has been properly placed, before beginning to work the fore-carriage should be locked.

    Fire Prevention and Fire Extinction

  • Immediately on the call being given to attach the hose, the sergeant locks the fore-carriage of the engine, and unlocks the levers.

    Fire Prevention and Fire Extinction

  • The fore-carriage of the engine is fitted with a pole, and is made to suit the harness of coach-horses, these being, in large towns, more easily procured than other draught cattle; this can be altered, however, to suit such harness as can most readily be obtained.

    Fire Prevention and Fire Extinction

  • This is done by putting an iron pin through a piece of wood attached to the cistern, into the fore-carriage.

    Fire Prevention and Fire Extinction

  • Why was that fore-carriage of a truck in that place in the street?

    Les Miserables, Volume I, Fantine

  • And then they sang the Marseillaise The horses were taken out of the carriage, the crowd surrounded it, climbing on the steps, the wheels, the fore-carriage, the roof.

    Memoirs (Vieux Souvenirs) of the Prince de Joinville

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