Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The forward mast on a sailing vessel.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. (on a ship with more than one mast) the mast nearest the bow

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The mast nearest the bow.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The forward mast of a ship or other vessel.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the mast nearest the bow in vessels with two or more masts

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I once asked one of those fellows what he called the foremast in his language, and what d'ye think he said?

    Poor Jack

  • Of course, two days 'work was required for the accomplishment of this part of my task, and it was not till the morning of the third day that I swung the foremast from the deck and proceeded to square its butt to fit the step.

    Chapter 37

  • Of course, two days’ work was required for the accomplishment of this part of my task, and it was not till the morning of the third day that I swung the foremast from the deck and proceeded to square its butt to fit the step.

    Chapter 37

  • The stump of her foremast was the only stick standing; her cabin had been stove in; every gun, except a single one, was dismounted; and her deck was covered with shattered limbs and dead bodies.

    The Life of Horatio Lord Nelson

  • The foremast, which is considerably smaller and stepped well forrard, is in like manner devoid of any kind of stay.

    Life and sport in China Second Edition

  • "The foremast is the main thing to get rid of now; and, unless the sea keeps still, we'll never manage to cut that away, for it is still more under water than the mainmast was."

    The White Squall A Story of the Sargasso Sea

  • The foremast was the only mast now remaining, and it was soon sent flying over the side by the terrific firing from the British ship.

    Drake Nelson and Napoleon

  • On the foremast was a seat on a hinge, which could be dropped down, on which the "doctor" could sit and do his work, roasting himself at the same time he roasted his beef or fried his fish.

    The Yacht Club or The Young Boat-Builder

  • I once asked one of those fellows what be called the foremast in his language, and what d'ye think he said?

    Poor Jack

  • 'prentices_, sich as he had for messmates, is always worse to their own kind by far nor the "_common sailors_," as the long-shore folks calls a foremast-man.

    The International Monthly Magazine, Volume 1, No. 1, August 1850 of Literature, Science and Art.

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