Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A coming forth.
  • v. To come forth.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A coming forth.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English forthcomen, from Old English forþcuman ("to come forth, proceed, arrive at, succeed, come to pass, come true, be born"), from Proto-Germanic *furþa- (“forth”), *kwemanan (“to come”), equivalent to forth- +‎ come.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English, from Old English forþcyme ("a forthcoming"), from Proto-Germanic *furþa- (“forth”), *kumiz (“coming”), equivalent to forth- +‎ come. Cognate with German Fortkommen ("advancement").

Examples

  • By dropping a penny in the slot, the gas was forthcoming, and when a penny's worth had forthcome the supply was automatically shut off.

    Those on the Edge

  • If at the end of that time ransom were not forthcoming death would forthcome.

    Foes

  • It makes for good dialogue in a forum like Inside HED, but adds little until the next time which is guaranteed to forthcome.

    Inside Higher Ed

  • a penny in the slot, the gas was forthcoming, and when a penny's worth had forthcome the supply was automatically shut off.

    THOSE ON THE EDGE

  • Hmm, well, having forgotten to pack one of those wacky “adapters” for the local electric and having not had a whole bunch of free time to go hunting for one, the torrent of D.C. Yankee in King Arthur’s Court blogs I hinted might be forthcoming seem not to have forthcome.

    London Calling

  • Christabel, and me for praising it, which omen, I think, bodes no great good to your forthcome or coming Canto and Castle (of

    Life of Lord Byron, Vol. 3 (of 6) With His Letters and Journals

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