fortune cookie love

Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A cookie made from a thin layer of dough folded and baked around a slip of paper bearing a prediction of fortune or a maxim.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A type of hollow snack, common in westernized Chinese food, containing a message on a narrow strip of paper, generally with a wise or vaguely prophetic message printed on the paper.
  • n. A quote-of-the-day feature (especially on *nix systems.)

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. thin folded wafer containing a maxim on a slip of paper

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • “For Asian Americans, the fortune and the fortune cookie can be a little bit of an embarrassing stereotype—that there is this stupefying thing,” says Peter Kwong, the Asian-American-studies professor.

    American Chinatown

  • In 2008, the fortune cookie turned ninety: See Reyhan Harmanci, “‘Killing of a Chinese Cookie’: Finding Fortune,” San Francisco Chronicle, March 20, 2008; and Vincent Cheng, “A Four-Legged Duck?”

    American Chinatown

  • In 2008, the fortune cookie turned ninety—that is, if you believe that Cantonese immigrant David Jung started distributing message-filled cookies outside his Los Angeles noodle company in 1918.

    American Chinatown

  • Why do you always tell people that I met your father in the Cathay House, that I broke open a fortune cookie and it said I would marry a dark, handsome stranger, and that when I looked up, there he was, the waiter, your father.

    The Joy Luck Club

  • Approximately forty other fortune cookie factories: See Jeremy Olshan, “Cookie Master,” New Yorker, June 6, 2005, p.

    American Chinatown

  • That evening An-mei and I went to work and searched through strips of fortune cookie papers, trying to find the right instructions to give to your father.

    The Joy Luck Club

  • What you see in the fortune cookie factory today is not like twenty years ago, Derrick Wong says.

    American Chinatown

  • There are no other big fortune cookie manufacturers on the East Coast; Golden Dragon in Chicago and Peking Noodle in Los Angeles may come closer to Wonton Food in production capacity than the traditional mom-and-pop shops do, but Wong brushes off the suggestion that the two operations might be his competitors.

    American Chinatown

  • More recent academic scholarship shows the fortune cookie in Japan, where one Japanese graduate student traced early mentions of tsujiura senbei—“fortune crackers”—to an 1878 book of stories.

    American Chinatown

  • In fact, when Wonton Food opened the first fortune cookie factory in China in 1994, it promptly closed.

    American Chinatown

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