Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The pursuit of a fox with hounds.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The turf and the fox-chase are his delights — the smoking-room at the

    The Kickleburys on the Rhine

  • Ah me! never was that gallant boy to ride a fox-chase, or to take the place amongst the gentry of his country which his birth and genius had pointed out for him!

    The Memoires of Barry Lyndon

  • _ You seem to forget, Nelly, that I saw one wedding all through, and, indeed, bore as prominent a part in it as one of my downtrodden sex could aspire to; and as the Frenchman said, who went on an English fox-chase, _ "Une fois, c'est assez; _ I am ver 'satisfy."

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 04, No. 24, October, 1859

  • It was my aim to get well on the road before Early could collect these scattered forces, and as many of the officers had been in the habit of amusing themselves fox-hunting during the latter part of the winter, I decided to use the hunt as an expedient for stealing a march on the enemy, and had it given out officially that a grand fox-chase would take place on the 29th of February.

    Memoirs of the Union's Three Great Civil War Generals

  • In a word, he struck up a fox-chase: Lady Dainty's dog, Mr. Sippet, as she calls him, started and jumped out of his lady's lap, and fell a barking.

    The Tatler, Volume 1, 1899

  • To draw patterns for ruffles, which I had not materials to make up; to play Pope Joan with the curate; to read a sermon to my aunt; or to be stuck down to an old spinet to strum my father to sleep after a fox-chase.

    The Ontario Readers: The High School Reader, 1886

  • The English fox-chase, in point of danger to the riders and their horses, is nothing to this race for the bottle.

    Ella Barnwell A Historical Romance of Border Life

  • Brown was puzzling himself to conceive how a fox-chase could take place among hills where it was barely possible for a pony, accustomed to the ground, to trot along, but where, quitting the track for half a yard’s breadth, the rider might be either bogged, or precipitated down the bank.

    Chapter XXV

  • To draw patterns for ruffles, which I had not materials to make up; to play Pope Joan with the curate; to read a sermon to my aunt; or to be stuck down to an old spinet to strum my father to sleep a after fox-chase.

    Act Second. Scene I

  • "I don't care nothin 'about that fox-chase," shouted Budlong, "You tell the court what you know about this case."

    Shawn of Skarrow

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