Definitions

Sorry, no definitions found. Check out and contribute to the discussion of this word!

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • “He told me that he had purchased a house fraim sic for me and it was on board, but when I arrived here, I found that he had not paid for it.”

    The House at Sugar Beach

  • No stoopy skratchypost needed. yes we haz jungle room, Iz in it now. btw Juicyface has 11 claws on front pauses clooding two on one toe. him shredding chair down to fraim!

    …tonight - Lolcats 'n' Funny Pictures of Cats - I Can Has Cheezburger?

  • But the road's unco wild, and sae mony red-coats about, forby the whigs, that are no muckle better (the young lads o 'them) if they meet a fraim body their lane in the muirs.

    Old Mortality, Complete

  • Sunk about one foot lower than the bottom fore of the house, this fire place is about 8 feet long and Six feet wide Secured with a fraim those houses are calculated for 4, 5 & 6 families, each familey haveing a nice painted ladder to assend up to their beads.

    The Journals of Lewis and Clark, 1804-1806

  • Size are Crossed at right angles and fastened with a throng to each hoop and also where each Stick Crosses each other. then the Skin when green is drawn tight over this fraim and fastened with throngs to the brim or outer hoop So as to form a perfect bason. one of those Canoes will carry 6 or 8 Men and their loads.

    The Journals of Lewis and Clark, 1804-1806

  • C. joined me from the lower camp with the Clahclellah cheif. there is an old village situated about halfway on the portage road the fraim of the houses, which are remarkably large one 160 by 45 feet, remain almost entire. the covering of the houses appears to have been sunk in a pond back of the village. this the chief informed us was the residence occasionally of his tribe. these houses are fraimed in the usual manner but consist of a double set as if oune house had been built within the other. the floors are on a level with the ground. the natives did not croud about us in such numbers today as yesterday, and behaved themselves much better; no doubt the precautions which they observed us take had a good effect.

    The Journals of Lewis and Clark, 1804-1806

  • Clark's camp and return for the remainder of our plunder. with six others I now set to work on my boat, which had been previously drawn out of the water before the men departed, and in two hours had her fraim in readiness to be deposited. had a cash dug and deposited the Fraim of the boat, some papers and a few other trivial articles of but little importance. the wind blew very hard the greater part of the day.

    The Journals of Lewis and Clark, 1804-1806

  • I passed a very extraordinary Indian lodge, or at least the fraim of one; it was formed of sixteen large cottonwood poles each about fifty feet long and at their larger end which rested on the ground as thick as a man's body; these were arranged in a circular manner at bottom and equally distributed except the omission of one on the East side which I suppose was the entrance to the lodge; the upper part of the poles are united in a common point above and secured with large wyths of willow brush. in the center of this fabric there was the remains of a large fire; and about the place the marks of about 80 leather lodges.

    The Journals of Lewis and Clark, 1804-1806

  • I therefore relinquished all further hope of my favorite boat and ordered her to be sunk in the water, that the skins might become soft in order the better to take her in peices tomorrow and deposite the iron fraim at this place as it could probably be of no further service to us. had I only singed my Elk skins in stead of shaving them I beleive the composition would have remained and the boat have answered; at least untill we could have reached the pine country which must be in advance of us from the pine which is brought down by the water and which is probably at no great distance where we might have supplyed ourselves with the necessary pich or gum. but it was now too late to introduce a remidy and I bid a dieu to my boat, and her expected services.

    The Journals of Lewis and Clark, 1804-1806

  • But the road’s unco wild, and sae mony red-coats about, forby the whigs, that are no muckle better (the young lads o’ them) if they meet a fraim body their lane in the muirs.

    Old Mortality

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.