Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A frater-house.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A frater house. See under frater.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Same as fraiter.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Latin frater brother: compare Italian frateria a brotherhood of monks. See friar.

Examples

  • South of the fratery is the slype or passage, with arched openings to the east and west.

    Scottish Cathedrals and Abbeys

  • Hale), collected many books, which he presented to the Chapter, built a Deanery House, and established a "fratery," or guild for the ministration to the spiritual and bodily wants of the sick and poor.

    Old St. Paul's Cathedral

  • After the procession they went sluggingly into the fratery-room, by the way of walk and healthful exercise, and there kneeled under the tables, leaning their breasts on lanterns.

    Five books of the lives, heroic deeds and sayings of Gargantua and his son Pantagruel

  • Some of them were learned elephants, some musicians, others philosophers, dancers, and showers of tricks; and all sat down at table in good order, silently eating and drinking like so many fathers in a fratery-room.

    Five books of the lives, heroic deeds and sayings of Gargantua and his son Pantagruel

  • The sacristy, chapter-house, fratery, and other apartments stretch from the transept southwards along the east side; above these, on the upper floor, were the dormitories, entering by an open staircase from the south transept.

    Scottish Cathedrals and Abbeys

  • South of the chapter-house was probably the fratery or monks 'day room.

    Scottish Cathedrals and Abbeys

  • The abbey appears to have been almost abolished shortly after the Reformation, the only parts of the monastic buildings allowed to remain being the fratery and portions of the chapter-house, which were incorporated with the mansion-house.

    Scottish Cathedrals and Abbeys

  • It has also a doorway to the fratery, and another to the apartment on the south side, the latter of which now only exists in part, the south end of the range having been destroyed.

    Scottish Cathedrals and Abbeys

  • On the west side of the cloister was the sub-prior's house, known also as Senzie House; south-east of the fratery is the prior's house or Hospitium Vetus, which was sometimes the residence of the bishop.

    Scottish Cathedrals and Abbeys

  • At the east end of this range there is a doorway from the cloister giving access to a staircase which led down to the lower level of the fratery, and the remainder of the south side was probably all occupied by the refectory.

    Scottish Cathedrals and Abbeys

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