Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The quality of being friable, or easily broken, crumbled, or reduced to powder; friableness.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The quality of being friable, or easily broken, crumbled, or reduced to powder.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. excessive breakableness

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • These in their decay further influence favorably that friability which is so desirable in soils that are cultivated, and as previously stated, the long, deep roots in their decay exercise a salutary influence on drainage.

    Clovers and How to Grow Them

  • Pressing firmly enough will cause a catastrophic breakdown in the sparse structure, causing it to shatter like glass - a property known as friability.

    Solid Smoke

  • The fontis were due to different causes: the friability of the soil; some landslip at a depth beyond the reach of man; the violent summer rains; the incessant flooding of winter; long, drizzling showers.

    Les Miserables

  • I know, would be changed into a perfect friability.

    An Essay Concerning Human Understanding

  • It is rightly said that an empty space plays the chief part in the production of hearing, for what people mean by ‘the vacuum’ is the air, which is what causes hearing, when that air is set in movement as one continuous mass; but owing to its friability it emits no sound, being dissipated by impinging upon any surface which is not smooth.

    On the Soul

  • And all of a sudden in the 20th century came the discovery of its fragility and friability.

    Harvard University Commencement Address (A World Split Apart)

  • On light soils, on the contrary, whose friability and openness are already too great, and which do not require to be increased, the manure will be best applied in a rotten condition.

    Manures and the principles of manuring

  • Compare pastry that is made with lard, lard substitutes, vegetable oils and butter, as to taste, appearance, flakiness or friability, and tenderness.

    School and Home Cooking

  • Air in itself is, owing to its friability, quite soundless; only when its dissipation is prevented is its movement sound.

    ON THE SOUL

  • It is rightly said that an empty space plays the chief part in the production of hearing, for what people mean by 'the vacuum' is the air, which is what causes hearing, when that air is set in movement as one continuous mass; but owing to its friability it emits no sound, being dissipated by impinging upon any surface which is not smooth.

    ON THE SOUL

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