Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of fribble.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • She was actually enjoying herself a little, even if the persons with whom she was conversing were the sort that Great-uncle would have condemned as empty-headed fribbles.

    Gatlinburg

  • OH and another time I was in Friendly's when a man got into a fight with the manager about the sub-par quality of his fribble, and how he'd had fribbles in Friendly's all across the country and he had never had a fribble as bad as this.

    YesButNoButYes: Fribble, Frosty or Shake?

  • What dullards, what fribbles, what addle-headed simple coxcombs!

    The Memoires of Barry Lyndon

  • In the end, I enjoyed the curlicues and fribbles on the Town Hall so much I came back on Saturday to take a few photos - as well as trying a couple more beers I'd not got to the first time, of course!

    So the year turns again...

  • Unfortunately such stalls do not contain fribbles like china tea sets and silver forks.

    Morgan’s Run

  • “We need kettles, stoves and calico more than fribbles,” said Richard, God the Fathering.

    Morgan’s Run

  • How the poor creature fribbles in his gait, and scuttles from place to place to despatch his necessary affairs in painful daylight, that he may return to the constant twilight preserved in that scene of wantonness, Messalina's bedchamber.

    The Tatler, Volume 1, 1899

  • Although robustious, our fribbles were harmless enough — ebullitions of animal spirit, sometimes perhaps of gaiety unguarded — though each shade, treading the Celestian way, as most of them do, and recurring to those Noctes Ambrosianae, might e'en repeat to the other the words on a memorable occasion addressed by Curran to Lord

    Marse Henry : an autobiography,

  • The silly fribbles who posture before the photographic cameras for penny newspapers do not represent the real aristocracy of England.

    The Glory of English Prose Letters to My Grandson

  • He seems to have charmed all classes: the learned and the ignorant, the cultured and the vulgar; great statesmen, poets, and even the fribbles of fashion were all nearly unanimous in his praise.

    The Drama

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