Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of frogmouth.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Often confused with owls because of their appearance and nocturnal hunting habits, tawny frogmouths are actually related to nightjars.

    ZooBorns

  • Second, it has distinct barring on the primary wing feathers and tail feathers, where other frogmouths are more uniform.

    Archive 2007-04-01

  • Its speckles are larger, and the white spots on its breast and underbelly are more pronounced than on other frogmouths.

    Archive 2007-04-01

  • Kratter and Steadman are co-authors to a study analyzing the frogmouth’s morphology, or physical form, and DNA in comparison to two other living genera of frogmouths.

    Archive 2007-04-01

  • First, it is probably not as accomplished of a flier because its eight tail-feathers, instead of the typical 10 to 12 on other frogmouths, curtail its lift potential, and its much coarser feathers reduce maneuverability. ...

    Archive 2007-04-01

  • Two other genera of frogmouths exist: one in southeast Asia and the other in Australia and New Guinea.

    Archive 2007-04-01

  • The Solomon Islands Frogmouth differs from other frogmouths in a number of significant ways.

    Archive 2007-04-01

  • The problem with this statement is that some of these affinities are sometimes mutually incompatible: Hackett et al. (2008), for example, found frogmouths to be about as far removed as possible from piciforms and 'core coraciiforms'*.

    ScienceBlogs Channel : Life Science

  • Furthermore, he suggested that it might group together with podargids (frogmouths), which seems odd but is at least consistent with some characters that are shared by the two (such as two powder down patches on the back).

    ScienceBlogs Channel : Life Science

  • * Hackett et al. (2008) recovered a neoavian clade that included flamingos and grebes (mirandornithines, if you like), tropicbirds, sandgrouse, mesites, pigeons, swifts and hummingbirds, and nightjars, frogmouths and so on.

    ScienceBlogs Channel : Life Science

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