Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. In an auditorium or sports venue, the line of side-by-side seats closest to the stage, playing field, or other location where the activity of interest is occurring.
  • n. The row of players who participate in a scrum with direct contact with the opposing scrum.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Within a week it carried him from a back seat near the door to the front row of shining examples beside Li Choi, who in the grateful promptings of her simple heart believed whatever she thought would please the matron of the mission, Miss Campbell.

    The Conversion of Ah Lew Sing

  • This one featured the Water Wings cocaptains actually looking away from the camera as they sat in the front row of a school board meeting.

    Maggie Bean in Love

  • But I said a few prayers for Kayla in the front row of St. Tony's — asking not just that she would survive her wounds but that she would mend in other important ways.

    Cross

  • The orchestra having received strict injunctions to sit with their backs to the brilliant assembly, probably to protect their eyesight from its dazzling effects, Spohr fitted himself out with a small mirror, and placing this upon his music-rack, he was able to enjoy for a couple of hours the vision of the great Napoleon, who, with his most distinguished guests, occupied the front row of the stalls.

    Famous Violinists of To-day and Yesterday

  • She wanted to be numb like Jesse, who sat in the front row with a stupid look on his face from the reefers or whatever else he smoked.

    Red Hats

  • And, despite sitting in the front row while my papa preaches about resurrection—

    Tricks

  • He nodded courteously to a man in the front row splayed languidly on his chair and stroking his sideburns, so lost in thought that he failed to catch Jack's gesture.

    Crusader Gold

  • Most of the jurors in the front row were scowling at Eve as Judge Thompson continued his lecture.

    Courting Trouble

  • It takes Irving Baumschnagel seven minutes to walk from the front row of the gallery to the witness stand, mostly because he is too stubborn to accept the help of a bailiff to steady him.

    VANISHING ACTS

  • "That first chair in the very front row is Elnora's," exulted Billy, "cos she's got the highest grades, and so she gets to lead the procession to the platform."

    A Girl of the Limberlost

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