Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. An Italian popular song, not so artistic as a madrigal nor so simple as a villanella, especially common in the sixteenth century.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Poliziano's "Orfeo" the frottola was the reigning form of part song, and that then and for years afterward it was customary to arrange frottole as solos by giving the polyphony to the lute or other accompanying instrument.

    Some Forerunners of Italian Opera

  • The frottola was a secular song, written in polyphonic style.

    Some Forerunners of Italian Opera

  • "Orfeo," while the frottola was the most popular song of the people.

    Some Forerunners of Italian Opera

  • The duo cantus cum tenor comes from Musica Duorum Rome, 1521, a collection of forty-five textless duets,or bicinia by the frottola composer Eustachio Romano.

    Archive 2009-06-01

  • The new Italian dances with their tuneful melodies often adapted from popular songs such as El Marchese di Saluzzo, well-defined phrases, and strong harmonic character have much in common with the frottola style.

    Archive 2009-06-01

  • The rise of the frottola was due in large part to the enterprising efforts of the Venetian publisher Ottaviano Petrucci.

    Archive 2009-06-01

  • The artistic climate created by her patronage fostered the development of the frottola, the genre of Italian song that flourished during the decades either side of 1500.

    Archive 2009-06-01

  • The variety of instrumentation represented in pictorial and musical sources suggests that the frottola was performed in many different ways.

    Archive 2009-06-01

  • The "Cortegiano" dates from 1514, though it was not published till a few years later, and the frottola was at the zenith of its excellence in the time of Bernado Tromboncino, who belongs to the latter half of the fifteenth century.

    Some Forerunners of Italian Opera

  • A typical frottola by Scotus shows observance of Cerone's requirements.

    Some Forerunners of Italian Opera

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