Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun See garb.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Broade Waye of New-Yorke, yee can tell a Philadelphienne by hir sober yet rich garbe, so that ye Cosmopolite sayth: '_Per ma fe!

    The Continental Monthly, Vol. 2, No. 1, July, 1862

  • In 1651 the General Court again expressed its "utter detestation and dislike that men or women of meane condition, education and callings should take uppon them the garbe of gentlemen by the wearinge of gold or silver lace or buttons or poynts at their knees, to walke in great boots, or women of the same rank to wear silke or tiffany hoodes or scarfes."

    Customs and Fashions in Old New England

  • In 1651 the Court again expressed its "utter detestation that men and women of meane condition, education, and calling, should take vppon them the garbe of gentlemen by wearinge of gold or silver lace, or buttons or poynts at their knees, or walke in great boots, or women of the same ranke to wear silke or tiffany hoods or scarfs."

    Home Life in Colonial Days

  • Divers gentlemen and persons of quality waited on him in the same garbe and habit, which at that time (when thirty or forty was the the usual retinue of the high sheriff) was esteemed a great matter.

    Notes and Queries, Number 211, November 12, 1853 A Medium of Inter-communication for Literary Men, Artists, Antiquaries, Genealogists, etc.

  • Lord HASTINGS unites the Hungerford sickle with the Peverel garbe: No. 270; and the _Dacre knot_ is entwined about the Dacre escallop and the famous “ragged staff” of Beauchamp and Neville: No. 235.

    The Handbook to English Heraldry

  • I perceive something of learning he hath got, but a great deale, if not too much, of the vanity of the French garbe and affected manner of speech and gait.

    Diary of Samuel Pepys — Complete 1664 N.S.

  • I perceive something of learning he hath got, but a great deale, if not too much, of the vanity of the French garbe and affected manner of speech and gait.

    Diary of Samuel Pepys — Volume 30: August/September 1664

  • I perceive something of learning he hath got, but a great deale, if not too much, of the vanity of the French garbe and affected manner of speech and gait.

    Diary of Samuel Pepys — Complete

  • I confess I have sucked in so much of the sad story of Queen Elizabeth, from my cradle, that I was ready to weep for her sometimes; but the play is the most ridiculous that sure ever come upon the stage; and, indeed, is merely a shew, only shews the true garbe of the Queen in those days, just as we see

    Diary of Samuel Pepys — Volume 56: August 1667

  • I perceive something of learning he hath got, but a great deale, if not too much, of the vanity of the French garbe and affected manner of speech and gait.

    The Diary of Samuel Pepys, Aug/Sep 1664

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