Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A summer-house in a garden or a garden-like situation.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • On my very first visit to the “Holy Land,” in the early 1970s, I stayed at some flophouse near the Damascus Gate in occupied East Jerusalem, and one day found myself walking past a handsome gated garden-house establishment that proudly displayed the name The American Colony.

    Lost in the Levant

  • On my very first visit to the “Holy Land,” in the early 1970s, I stayed at some flophouse near the Damascus Gate in occupied East Jerusalem, and one day found myself walking past a handsome gated garden-house establishment that proudly displayed the name The American Colony.

    Lost in the Levant

  • On my very first visit to the “Holy Land,” in the early 1970s, I stayed at some flophouse near the Damascus Gate in occupied East Jerusalem, and one day found myself walking past a handsome gated garden-house establishment that proudly displayed the name The American Colony.

    Lost in the Levant

  • "We were afraid the government would take it away from us," admitted one proud garden-house resident, Pham Huu Dien, 83.

    The Battle for Hue

  • Paris, — he arrived before a simple garden-house, whose humble and modest front seemed to announce that it was the abode of philosophy and learning.

    Count Robert of Paris

  • It is no secretary of mine that will be lodged in the Rue Saint – Maur in the little garden-house which I have at his disposal.

    Honorine

  • It is no secretary of mine that will be lodged in the Rue Saint – Maur in the little garden-house which I have at his disposal.

    Honorine

  • The ladies begged occasionally that the child might pass a day with them, and he was always glad to go to that fine garden-house at Denmark Hill, where they lived, and where there were such fine grapes in the hot-houses and peaches on the walls.

    Vanity Fair

  • Glancing once more towards the long front of the garden-house, I perceived that its solitary light was at length extinguished; so, for a time, was my faith is love and friendship.

    The Professor, by Charlotte Bronte

  • In effect, a sound of noisy mirth and loud talking approached the garden door, alarmed by which Wayland Smith sprung into the midst of a thicket of overgrown shrubs, while Janet withdrew to the garden-house that she might not incur observation, and that she might at the same time conceal, at least for the present, the purchases made from the supposed pedlar, which lay scattered on the floor of the summer-house.

    Kenilworth

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