Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A boastful person; a braggart.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[From Gascon (from the traditional stereotype of Gascons as braggarts).]

Examples

  • Jarrard Cole, Assistant Multimedia Editor, The Daily Tar Heel sami gascon 1 year ago incredible... really cool!

    Timelapse: Franklin Street after the victory on Vimeo

  • It's like a trou gascon — the neat shot of Armagnac tossed back midmeal to ready you for cassoulet.

    Grapes of Gascony

  • It's like a trou gascon — the neat shot of Armagnac tossed back midmeal to ready you for cassoulet.

    Grapes of Gascony

  • The Cuisinier gascon also gives, as Italian, recipes for two varieties of what he calls “strouille,” one sweet and the other savory.27 They appear to be strudels, and I cannot explain their appearance in Italian guise, save that Italian food of all sorts enjoyed a considerable vogue in mid-eighteenth-century France.

    Savoring The Past

  • The Cuisinier gascon (Amsterdam, 1740) is not Gascon (although it does contain a recipe for garbure), and there is some question as to whether the author was a cuisinier.

    Savoring The Past

  • The cuisinier gascon uses the basic mixtures much less than do other eighteenth-century cooks, considering them a trifle old-fashioned: “I will not speak at all of jus, coulis, bouillon, essence, and all those old liaisons which are made; they are found in the book of Martialot [sic] in his old manuscripts [sic].”

    Savoring The Past

  • He neither strains for effect like the cuisinier gascon nor repeats himself mechanically like Vincent La Chapelle.

    Savoring The Past

  • The cuisinier gascon uses the basic mixtures much less than do other eighteenth-century cooks, considering them a trifle old-fashioned: “I will not speak at all of jus, coulis, bouillon, essence, and all those old liaisons which are made; they are found in the book of Martialot [sic] in his old manuscripts [sic].”

    Savoring The Past

  • Marin (the author of Les Dons de Comus), Menon (whose work spans both haute cuisine and bourgeois cooking), and the anonymous authors of the Cuisinier gascon and the Soupers de la cour were the rulers of this new empire.

    Savoring The Past

  • Marin ranks with Menon and above the compiler of the Cuisinier gascon among the chief cookbook writers of his day.

    Savoring The Past

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