Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of gentlewoman.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • One of Mary's gentlewomen from the Welsh household, Anne Hussey, found herself imprisoned in 1536 because she referred to Mary, inadvertently, as "my lady Princess" when asking a servant to bring them both a drink.

    From Heads of Household to Heads of State: The Preaccession Households of Mary and Elizabeth Tudor, 1516-1558

  • "All three, then, were what might be termed gentlewomen?"

    Pathfinder; or, the inland sea

  • But the Reverend Hanbury was beset by aggressive and cold-hearted neighbors, among them two strange old "gentlewomen," Mistress Pickering and Mistress Byrd, who malevolently ordered their cattle to be turned loose into his first plantation of twenty thousand young and thrifty trees.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 13, No. 77, March, 1864

  • That lady had found her true place among England's "gentlewomen" (?), though she had utterly failed to do so among Virginia's.

    A Dixie School Girl

  • Jumble sales, vicars, spinsters, and other excellent women who prepare indexes and collect jumble for distressed gentlewomen.

    My new secret boyfriend

  • It was an outlandish thing for two Victorian gentlewomen to do.

    Lessons of a Frontier Letter Writer

  • NOTE: When George I imported his seraglio of impoverished gentlewomen from Germany, he provided the Jacobite songwriters with material for some of their most ribald verses.

    Great Scots

  • NOTE: When George I imported his seraglio of impoverished gentlewomen from Germany, he provided the Jacobite songwriters with material for some of their most ribald verses.

    Archive 2009-08-01

  • Ladies began to carve out a separate, independent life of their own by the late 1890s, and there came to London a proliferation of clubs catering specifically to gentlewomen of rank and means.

    London’s Ladies’ Clubs | Edwardian Promenade

  • For nothing but the most commonplace of commonplaces; a table of gentlewomen and gentlemen—soft-spoken, sweet-tempered, full of human sympathy, who made me, a stranger, one of them.

    DARKWATER

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