Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Past participle of gnaw

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Morrice, ashamed of his exploit, and frightened by the looks of Mr Monckton, made an apology with the utmost humility, and hurried away: and Mr Monckton, hopeless of any better fortune, soon did the same, gnawn with a cruel discontent which he did not dare avow, and longing. to revenge himself upon Morrice, even by personal chastisement.

    Cecilia

  • The bones of the cutlets were decorated with pink frills – and yesterday he had gnawn ham from the bone!

    Jacob's Room

  • This hotel stands in the principal street of Lincoln, and within a very short distance of one of the ancient city-gates, which is arched across the public way, with a smaller arch for foot-passengers on either side; the whole, a gray, time-gnawn, ponderous, shadowy structure, through the dark vista of which you look into the Middle Ages.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 09, No. 51, January, 1862

  • You are fleeced by these landlords for their private benefit, and as well kept under by the public burdens of State, wherein while the richer sort favour themselves, ye are gnawn to the very bones.

    The Rise of the Democracy

  • Before thee the Stygian pools [296-329] shook for fear, before thee the warder of hell, couched on half-gnawn bones in his blood-stained cavern; to thee not any form was terrible, not Typhoeus 'self towering in arms; thou wast not bereft of counsel when the snake of Lerna encompassed thee with thronging heads.

    The Aeneid of Virgil

  • Neither shrink thou at the gnawn tables that await thee; the fates will find a way, and Apollo aid thy call.

    The Aeneid of Virgil

  • My bed shall be abused, my coffers ransacked, my reputation gnawn at; and I shall not only receive this villanous wrong, but stand under the adoption of abominable terms, and by him that does me this wrong.

    Act II. Scene II. The Merry Wives of Windsor

  • 'Like blazing torches,' and 'like bare gnawn bones.'

    Psalms of the Sisters

  • The bones of the cutlets were decorated with pink frills - and yesterday he had gnawn ham from the bone!

    Jacob's Room

  • By treason’s tooth bare-gnawn and canker-bit, 18136

    Act V. Scene III

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.