Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A pen or yard for geese.
  • noun In forestry, a large hole burned in a standing tree.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun An enclosure for geese.
  • noun obsolete A quill pen.
  • verb rare To write with a quill pen.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Let there be gall enough in thy ink, though thou write with a goose-pen, no matter: about it.

    Twelfth Night; or, What You Will

  • This upright tradesman was attending to his business one cold day in May, 1803, soon after Nelson sailed from Portsmouth, and he stood with his beloved pounds of farm-house butter, bladders of lard, and new-laid eggs, and squares of cream-cheese behind him, with a broad butter-spathe of white wood in his hand, a long goose-pen tucked over his left ear, and the great copper scales hanging handy.

    Springhaven

  • Mr.. Pullet observed that the child might come to a worse end if she lived, there was no knowing; and Mr. Pullet reached down a key to the goose-pen as a likely place for Maggie to lie concealed in.

    Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 7

  • As he approached Mr. Peck's barn, he beheld Al returning from the direction of his goose-pen.

    Golden Days for Boys and Girls, Vol. XIII, Nov. 28, 1891

  • _Sir Toby_: -- 'Let there be gall in thy ink, though thou write with a goose-pen.'

    Shakspere and Montaigne

  • QUOTATION: Let there be gall enough in thy ink; though thou write with a goose-pen, no matter.

    Quotations

  • Mrs. Pullet observed that the child might come to a worse end if she lived, there was no knowing; and Mr. Pullet, confused and overwhelmed by this revolutionary aspect of things, —the tea deferred and the poultry alarmed by the unusual running to and fro, —took up his spud as an instrument of search, and reached down a key to unlock the goose-pen, as a likely place for Maggie to lie concealed in.

    X. Maggie Behaves Worse Than She Expected. Book I—Boy and Girl

  • Let there be gall enough in thy ink, though thou write with a goose-pen, no matter: about it.

    Act III. Scene II. Twelfth-Night; or, What You Will

  • Then I fall from grace and call her a Broiler; and when, after some minutes of hot pursuit, I catch her by falling over her in the corner by the goose-pen, I address her as a fat, juicy Broiler with parsley butter and a bit of bacon.

    The Diary of a Goose Girl

  • Let there be gall enough in thy ink; though thou write with a goose-pen, no matter.

    Familiar Quotations A Collection of Passages, Phrases, and Proverbs Traced to Their Sources in Ancient and Modern Literature

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