Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of gossip.
  • verb Third-person singular simple present indicative form of gossip.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Instant messaging, favored by chatting teens and office gossips, is a growing tool for therapists counseling people on everything from smoking cessation to sexual-abuse trauma, reports the Pioneer Press.

    Smart Mobs » Blog Archive » e-therapy

  • Instant messaging, favored by chatting teens and office gossips, is a growing tool for therapists counseling people on everything from smoking cessation to sexual-abuse trauma, reports the Pioneer Press.

    Smart Mobs » Blog Archive » e-therapy

  • Nor, again, are those who are concerned with the other pleasures that are not bodily; for those who are fond of hearing and telling stories and who spend their days on anything that turns up are called gossips, but not self-indulgent, nor are those who are pained at the loss of money or of friends.

    The Nicomachean Ethics

  • They had few close friends and were not known as gossips.

    The Long Night

  • They had few close friends and were not known as gossips.

    The Long Night

  • Now men are not called perfectly self-mastering or wholly destitute of self-control in respect of pleasures of this class: nor in fact in respect of any which are not bodily; those for example who love to tell long stories, and are prosy, and spend their days about mere chance matters, we call gossips but not wholly destitute of self-control, nor again those who are pained at the loss of money or friends.

    Ethics

  • The choicest food of the gossips is the personal peculiarities of their acquaintances.

    Lessons in Life A Series of Familiar Essays

  • In all societies, there are men and women who are vaguely known as gossips; but they are seldom caught red-handed.

    Vanishing Roads and Other Essays

  • Patsy's stiff face as he repelled the gossips was a sight to see.

    Love of Brothers

  • Nor, again, are those who are concerned with the other pleasures that are not bodily; for those who are fond of hearing and telling stories and who spend their days on anything that turns up are called gossips, but not self-indulgent, nor are those who are pained at the loss of money or of friends.

    The NICOMACHEAN ETHICS

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