Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A passion for and deep interest in good food.
  • noun gluttony

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the disposition and habits of a gourmand

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

gourmand +‎ -ism

Examples

  • His gourmandism was a highly agreeable trait; and to hear him talk of roast meat was as appetizing as a pickle or an oyster.

    The Scarlet Letter

  • His gourmandism was a highly agreeable trait; and to hear him talk of roast meat was as appetizing as a pickle or an oyster.

    The Custom-House. Introductory to “The Scarlet Letter”

  • His gourmandism was a highly agreeable trait; and to hear him talk of roast-meat

    The Scarlet Letter

  • His gourmandism was a highly agreeable trait; and to hear him talk of roast meat was as appetizing as a pickle or an oyster.

    The Scarlet Letter

  • His gourmandism was a highly agreeable trait; and to hear him talk of roast-meat was as appetizing as a pickle or an oyster.

    The Scarlet Letter

  • Brillat-Savarin was convinced that the celebration of food entailed by gourmandism, ‘the reasoned comprehension of everything connected with the nourishment of man’, had great health benefits: ‘[T] hose who know how to eat look ten years younger than those to whom the science is a mystery.’

    The Triumph of Gluttony

  • Brillat-Savarin was confident in his time that ‘nowadays everyone understands the difference between gourmandism and gluttony’; alas, it would seem that we have lost sight of the difference and the supermarkets have come to represent the triumph of gluttony.

    The Triumph of Gluttony

  • For perhaps the first time, a significant proportion of the European population could rely on the availability of an abundance of food, and he sought to distinguish clearly between the celebration of food that he extolled as gourmandism and the worrying tendency towards gluttony that such plenty allowed for.

    The Triumph of Gluttony

  • Brillat-Savarin was confident in his time that ‘nowadays everyone understands the difference between gourmandism and gluttony’; alas, it would seem that we have lost sight of the difference and the supermarkets have come to represent the triumph of gluttony.

    The Triumph of Gluttony

  • For perhaps the first time, a significant proportion of the European population could rely on the availability of an abundance of food, and he sought to distinguish clearly between the celebration of food that he extolled as gourmandism and the worrying tendency towards gluttony that such plenty allowed for.

    The Triumph of Gluttony

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.