Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of governess.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Women in this set used to be called governesses, a word coined in 1483 about a king who made his daughter “maystresse and gouvernesse of moo than two hondred Vyrgyns.”

    No Uncertain Terms

  • Women in this set used to be called governesses, a word coined in 1483 about a king who made his daughter “maystresse and gouvernesse of moo than two hondred Vyrgyns.”

    No Uncertain Terms

  • Women in this set used to be called governesses, a word coined in 1483 about a king who made his daughter “maystresse and gouvernesse of moo than two hondred Vyrgyns.”

    No Uncertain Terms

  • Women in this set used to be called governesses, a word coined in 1483 about a king who made his daughter “maystresse and gouvernesse of moo than two hondred Vyrgyns.”

    No Uncertain Terms

  • And the lives of governesses, that is the written lives, can be counted on the fingers of one hand.

    Three Guineas

  • I can squeeze you all in; but I cannot manage the governesses, that is the only thing.

    A Modern Tomboy A Story for Girls

  • Born in a small village near Durham, Philippa was educated at home by governesses and at St George's school, Ascot, and rode to hounds with the Zetland hunt.

    Philippa Foot obituary

  • Tracy Borman acquaints us with a diverse cast, from governesses, ladies in waiting and courtiers, but the most well-known include her mother, Anne Boleyn, and her stepmother, Katherine Howard, both beheaded under orders from her father.

    Three books on British royals

  • Tracy Borman acquaints us with a diverse cast, from governesses, ladies in waiting and courtiers, but the most well-known include her mother, Anne Boleyn, and her stepmother, Katherine Howard, both beheaded under orders from her father.

    Three books on British royals

  • The teenage Serb looks exactly as he would when he played for Aston Villa, glowering out of the team photo like the sort of bodice-ripper anti-hero whose brutish vulnerability would repel and yet strangely attract governesses and the poetically inclined daughters of the local gentry which is more or less what he did with Villa fans too, come to think of it.

    Paul Lambert needs lessons in the lexicon of the football club | Harry Pearson

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