Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The final drink passed round after grace at the end of a feast, meal etc.; a parting drink.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A cup, generally a standing cup, goblet, hanap, or other large vessel, in which the last draught was drunk at table, being passed from guest to guest.
  • n. A draught from this cup.
  • n. A richly spiced and flavored drink served in the grace-cup. The recipe for the Oxford gracecup provides for strong beer flavored with lemon-peel, nutmeg, and sugar, with very brown toast soaked in it.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • “Marked you the pledge he gave us! instead of a prayer, over his grace-cup yonder.”

    The Talisman

  • The horsemen also, in little parties, as their road lay together, diverged from the place of rendezvous, excepting such as, having tried their dexterity at the popinjay, were, by ancient custom, obliged to partake of a grace-cup with their captain before their departure.

    Old Mortality

  • ‘Saddle me old Sorrel,’ said he suddenly, after he had taken his usual night-draught out of the great silver grace-cup, ‘and take the hounds to Mount Hazelhurst tomorrow.’

    Kenilworth

  • When a few rounds had passed, the two latter, after whispering together, craved permission (a joyful hearing for Edward) to ask the grace-cup.

    Waverley

  • The grace-cup was accordingly served round, and the guests, after making deep obeisance to their landlord and to the Lady Rowena, arose and mingled in the hall, while the heads of the family, by separate doors, retired with their attendants.

    Ivanhoe

  • Many of the objects possess considerable interest; such as the chair of the Venerable Bede, Cromwell's sword and watch, and the grace-cup of Thomas à Becket.

    Notes and Queries, Number 04, November 24, 1849

  • After such consoling repast, it would have been a reflection on monastic hospitality to have departed without partaking of the grace-cup; moreover, Father Cuddy had a particular respect for the antiquity of that custom.

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 10, No. 270, August 25, 1827

  • He liked the taste of the grace-cup well; he tried another, -- it was no less excellent; and when he had swallowed the third he found his heart expand, and put forth its fibres, as willing to embrace all mankind!

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 10, No. 270, August 25, 1827

  • The grace-cup was shortly after served round, and the guests marshalled to their sleeping apartment.

    The World's Greatest Books — Volume 07 — Fiction

  • The company now dispersed, excepting such as, having tried their dexterity at the popinjay, were, by ancient custom, obliged to partake of a grace-cup with their captain, who, though he spared the cup himself, took care it should go round with due celerity among the rest.

    The World's Greatest Books — Volume 07 — Fiction

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