Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of granulation.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In India my sense was of finer and finer granulations all the way down, like the slow formation of rich loam, reducing all our efforts, and our bodies, to a dark colloidal suspension of potential fertility.

    Tea at the Taj, time, scale and rowboats

  • It is a bad thing for the flesh (granulations?) in an ulcer to be moist and mouldy, and to require a long time to become clean.

    On Injuries Of The Head

  • It began now to discharge pus; granulations sprang up, and it healed.

    On Vaccination Against Smallpox

  • This simple experiment illustrates the important fact that granulations have no inherent tendency to form pus, but do so only when subjected to preternatural stimulus.

    On the Antiseptic Principle of the Practice of Surgery

  • The pyogenic membrane, like the granulations of a sore, which it resembles in nature, forms pus, not from any inherent disposition to do so, but only because it is subjected to some preternatural stimulation.

    On the Antiseptic Principle of the Practice of Surgery

  • But when the evacuation is effected on the antiseptic principle, the pyogenic membrane, freed from the influence of the former stimulus without the substitution of a new one, ceases to suppurate (like the granulations of a sore under metallic dressing), furnishing merely a trifling amount of clear serum, and, whether the opening be dependent or not, rapidly contracts and coalesces.

    On the Antiseptic Principle of the Practice of Surgery

  • Hence it is easy to understand how, when a wound is very large, the crust beneath the rag may prove here and there insufficient to protect the raw surface from the stimulating influence of the carbolic acid in the putty; and the result will be first the conversion of the tissues so acted on into granulations, and subsequently the formation of more or less pus.

    On the Antiseptic Principle of the Practice of Surgery

  • Here the clean metallic surface presents no recesses like those of porous lint for the septic germs to develope in, the fluid exuding from the surface of the granulations has flowed away undecomposed, and the result is the absence of suppuration.

    On the Antiseptic Principle of the Practice of Surgery

  • Follicles are the basic lesions; there are whitish granulations on an inflammatory base.

    Chapter 10

  • Its surface was mottled with great ugly spots, leprous with the scaly markings called faculae and granulations.

    Starchild Omnibus

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.