Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Any of several woody-stemmed Australian plants of the genus Xanthorrhoea, having stiff grasslike leaves, palmlike stems, and a spike of small white flowers.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An Australian plant of the genus Xanthorrhoea, having a thick trunk crowned with a dense tuft of pendulous, grass-like leaves, from whose centre arises a long stem, bearing at its summit a dense flower spike looking somewhat like a large cat-tail.
  • n. A similar Australian plant (Kingia australis).

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • An Australian plant of the genus Xanthorrhœa, having a thick trunk crowned with a dense tuft of pendulous, grasslike leaves, from the center of which arises a long stem, bearing at its summit a dense flower spike looking somewhat like a large cat-tail. These plants are often called “blackboys” from the large trunks denuded and blackened by fire. They yield two kinds of fragrant resin, called Botany-bay gum, and Gum Acaroides.
  • A similar Australian plant (Kingia australis).

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. gaunt Tasmanian evergreen shrubby tree with slender tapering leaves 3 to 5 feet long
  • n. elegant tree having either a single trunk or a branching trunk each with terminal clusters of long narrow leaves and large panicles of fragrant white, yellow or red flowers; New Zealand
  • n. any of several Australian evergreen perennials having short thick woody stems crowned by a tuft of grasslike foliage and yielding acaroid resins

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Instead of a slender sapling (preferably of red mangrove), straightened and toughened patiently over the fire, he would provide himself with the scape of a grass tree (XANTHORRHEA ARBOREA), true and straight as a billiard cue, light, and 8 or 10 feet long.

    The Confessions of a Beachcomber

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