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Etymologies

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Examples

  • And most direly, a Thai basil plant: a matte, darker green-leaved variety with perfectly jagged edges on its leaves like a serrated knife.

    Taiwanese Three Cup Chicken

  • He had stuck a green-leaved twig upright in the floor, and had so turned over a gugglet of water, that its contents trickled slowly, in a tiny stream under the verdure; whilst he was sitting before it mentally gazing, with an outward show of grim Quixotic tenderness, upon the shady trees and the cool rills of his fatherland.

    Personal Narrative of a Pilgrimage to Al-Madinah and Meccah

  • Sprigs of green-leaved oak, ash, and thorn sprang from a vase like a shout of life.

    Operation Luna

  • There is some information on toxic leaves and the culture of green-leaved vegetables.

    2: Vegetables and small fruits in the tropics

  • The potatoes had been planted in evenly spaced hillocks, but the green-leaved plants nearly covered all the open ground of the third field, except along the diagonal line where the water from the storm eight-days earlier had created a trench, since filled in.

    Fall of Angels

  • As they turn into an even broader corridor, wide-glassed windows on the left show a garden with a hedge of short, green-leaved bushes cut into a maze centering on a pond with a central fountain.

    The Towers of the Sunset

  • The green-leaved variety of Rosemary is the sort to be used medicinally.

    Herbal Simples Approved for Modern Uses of Cure

  • A good long stretch of wall covered with a selection of the best green-leaved kind is always interesting, and never more so than during the winter months, especially if at intervals the golden Japanese jasmine is planted among them or a few plants of pyracantha or of Simmon's cotoneaster for the sake of their coral fruitage.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 433, April 19, 1884

  • Probably more than 90 per cent of the nitrogen absorbed by green-leaved plants from the soil is absorbed as nitrates.

    Manures and the principles of manuring

  • With regard to the carbon of green-leaved plants, which amounts to from 40 to 50 per cent, subsequent research has confirmed Sénébier and de Saussure's conclusions, that its source is the carbonic acid gas of the air.

    Manures and the principles of manuring

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