Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The state or quality of being green; verdure.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The state or quality of being green; verdure.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The quality of being green, especially with growing plants; greenness; verdure.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

green +‎ -th

Examples

  • Neatness and greenth are so essential in my opinion to the country, that in France, where I see nothing but chalk and dirty peasants, I seem in a terrestrial purgatory that is neither town or country.

    The Art of Letters

  • She was like a Sun shedding sheen in sky serene, or a full moon at the fullest seen, with brow flower - bright and eyes black and white and beauty-spots fresh as greenth to the sight; brief she was as one of whom the poet saith,

    Arabian nights. English

  • An fount of life thou drain in greenth of rose, * While drink I tear drops for my sole desert?

    Arabian nights. English

  • Imagine a rambling, patchy house, the best part built of gray stone, and red-tiled, a round tower jutting at one of the corners, the mellow darkness of its conical roof surmounted by a weather-cock making an agreeable object either amidst the gleams and greenth of summer or the low-hanging clouds and snowy branches of winter: the ground shady with spreading trees: a great tree flourishing on one side, backward some

    Daniel Deronda

  • I have long been mortified that for these three years you have seen it only in winter: it is now in the height of its greenth, blueth, gloomth, honey-suckle and seringahood.

    The Letters of Horace Walpole, Earl of Orford — Volume 2

  • I will not, however, tell you, that I am Content with your being there, till you have seen it in all its greenth and blueth.

    The Letters of Horace Walpole, Earl of Orford — Volume 2

  • Neatness and greenth are so essential in my opinion to the country, that in France, where I see nothing but chalk and dirty peasants, I seem in a terrestrial purgatory that is neither town nor country.

    The Letters of Horace Walpole, Earl of Orford — Volume 3

  • The greenth used to take my breath away back when I was living there and flying back and forth from Australia every now and then.

    In a strange land

  • I tired myself with walking on Friday: the gout came on Saturday in my foot; yesterday I kept my bed till four o'clock, and my room all day-but, with wrapping myself all over with bootikins, have scarce had any pain-my foot swelled immediately, and today I am descended into the blueth and greenth: (76) and though you expect to find that I am paving the way to an excuse, I think I shall be able to be with you on

    The Letters of Horace Walpole, Earl of Orford — Volume 4

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