Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb Present participle of gross.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Certainly, the direct-to-DVD business can be extremely profitable, with a few live-action titles grossing more than $30 million from DVD sales.

    Sony Series Will Start on Web, Go to DVD

  • At least they will provoke world peace (and break a grossing record).

    Latest amIright Song Parodies

  • Sony and Warner Bros. also are having a banner year, with Sony titles grossing slightly north of $2 billion internationally and Warners grossing roughly $1.85 billion to date.

    Variety.com

  • What happened after that, says Steve Van Putten, a senior executive pay consultant for Watson Wyatt in Boston, was that companies started paying this penalty tax for executives, a process called grossing up.

    msnbc.com: Top msnbc.com headlines

  • What happened after that, says Steve Van Putten, a senior executive pay consultant for Watson Wyatt in Boston, was that companies started paying this penalty tax for executives, a process called grossing up.

    msnbc.com: Top msnbc.com headlines

  • What happened after that, says Steve Van Putten, a senior executive pay consultant for Watson Wyatt in Boston, was that companies started paying this penalty tax for executives, a process called grossing up.

    msnbc.com: Top msnbc.com headlines

  • What happened after that, says Steve Van Putten, a senior executive pay consultant for Watson Wyatt in Boston, was that companies started paying this penalty tax for executives, a process called grossing up.

    msnbc.com: Top msnbc.com headlines

  • What happened after that, says Steve Van Putten, a senior executive pay consultant for Watson Wyatt in Boston, was that companies started paying this penalty tax for executives, a process called grossing up.

    msnbc.com: Top msnbc.com headlines

  • What happened after that, says Steve Van Putten, a senior executive pay consultant for Watson Wyatt in Boston, was that companies started paying this penalty tax for executives, a process called grossing up.

    msnbc.com: Top msnbc.com headlines

  • What happened after that, says Steve Van Putten, a senior executive pay consultant for Watson Wyatt in Boston, was that companies started paying this penalty tax for executives, a process called grossing up.

    msnbc.com: Top msnbc.com headlines

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