Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The twin-flower, Linnæa borealis.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • "You don't think that anybody would have been so utterly idiotic as to call me after a ground-vine -- a vegetable?" she continued petulantly.

    A Ward of the Golden Gate

  • Glen; the trees stood high and haughty, feeling their living sap; the industrious earth beneath was as a weaver's loom, with a gorgeous carpet on it, whereof the ground-vine tendrils formed the warp and woof, and the living flowers the figures.

    Moby Dick, or, the whale

  • The wood was green as mosses of the Icy Glen; the trees stood high and haughty, feeling their living sap; the industrious earth beneath was as a weaver's loom, with a gorgeous carpet on it, whereof the ground-vine tendrils formed the warp and woof, and the living flowers the figures.

    Moby Dick: or, the White Whale

  • It was a wondrous sight. the wood was green as mosses of the icy Glen; the trees stood high and haughty, feeling their living sap; the industrious earth beneath was as a weaver's loom, with a gorgeous carpet on it, whereof the ground-vine tendrils formed the warp and woof, and the living flowers the figures.

    Moby-Dick, or, The Whale

  • Glen; the trees stood high and haughty, feeling their living sap; the industrious earth beneath was as a weaver’s loom, with a gorgeous carpet on it, whereof the ground-vine tendrils formed the warp and woof, and the living flowers the figures.

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • a low ground-vine, not dissimilar to a species of that vegetable usual to warm climates.

    ROCKY MOUNTAIN LIFE

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