Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of groundling.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He settled himself against the balustrade separating the groundlings from the lower seats and waited.

    EXCLUSIVE EXCERPT 2/5: The Bookman by Lavie Tidhar

  • Beside that was a patch of hard-pressed gravel, part of the area where the "groundlings" - theatergoers holding cheap standing-room-only tickets - crowded together to watch plays.

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  • In Shakespeare's day the groundlings were a lot more unruly, and you could say that that actress wasn't being sincere or true to her Shakespearean traditions, taking umbrage at a harmless bit of tom foolery that wouldn't have caused Richard Burbage to drop so much as a single iamb from To be, or not to be.

    Lance Mannion:

  • In Shakespeare's day the groundlings were a lot more unruly, and you could say that that actress wasn't being sincere or true to her Shakespearean traditions, taking umbrage at a harmless bit of tom foolery that wouldn't have caused Richard Burbage to drop so much as a single iamb from To be, or not to be.

    Miles of aisles

  • Almost his only concession to the groundlings is the star-gazing episode of Lady Froth and Brisk: a mistake, because it spoils her inconsequent folly, but a small matter.

    The Comedies of William Congreve Volume 1 [of 2]

  • Court were known as "groundlings" (jige); the residence of the

    A History of the Japanese People From the Earliest Times to the End of the Meiji Era

  • His appeal has been to the few rather than the many, to an audience of scholars and of the judicious rather than to the "groundlings" of the general public.

    Initial Studies in American Letters

  • The six-penny spectators, or "groundlings," stood in the yard or pit, which had neither floor nor roof.

    From Chaucer to Tennyson

  • His appeal has been to the few rather than the many, to an audience of scholars and of the judicious rather than to the "groundlings" of the general public.

    Brief History of English and American Literature

  • The six-penny spectators, or "groundlings," stood in the yard, or pit, which had neither floor nor roof.

    Brief History of English and American Literature

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