Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Having the form or structure of a crane; resembling or related to a crane.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In their comprehensive and influential study of DNA hybridization, Sibley & Ahlquist (1990) supported gruiform monophyly, as did Livezey (1998) in a large study of morphological data, and Cracraft et al. (2004) on genetic data.

    Goodbye, my giant predatory, cursorial, flightless hoatzin

  • Most recently, Ericson et al. (2006), in a study of molecular sequence data, also supported gruiform polyphyly.

    Goodbye, my giant predatory, cursorial, flightless hoatzin

  • In a study of osteological and soft-tissue characters, Mayr & Clarke (2003) also found gruiforms to be polyphyletic: rails, trumpeters and cranes (referred to from hereon as the ‘gruiform core’) were one of the most basal groups within Neoaves, bustards were without close relatives, and seriemas formed a clade with … .. hoatzins.

    Goodbye, my giant predatory, cursorial, flightless hoatzin

  • Different gruiforms were found to belong to both groups; mesites, kagus and sunbitterns were metavians close to owlet nightjars, grebes and sandgrouse; seriemas and bustards were coronavians without close relatives; while the gruiform core was part of a coronavian clade that included divers, cuckoos, turacos, tubenosed seabirds, storks, herons, penguins and pelicans.

    Goodbye, my giant predatory, cursorial, flightless hoatzin

  • Their study is significant in that they found support for Fain & Houde’s Metaves-Coronaves division, and the gruiform groups fell into pretty similar positions, though with exceptions.

    Goodbye, my giant predatory, cursorial, flightless hoatzin

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